How to Read FORTUNE in Bed

Promotion booklet written and designed by Leo Lionni, 1952
Source: The Daily Heller

FORTUNE January 1939

Henry Kreis, Artist
Francis Brennan, Art Director 

From “FORTUNE’s Wheel” January 1939: 
… you’re probably wondering about the cover on this issue. The idea of it originated in FORTUNE’s art department, logically enough, and so far as we know it’s new. We asked that eminent young sculptor, Henry Kreis, if he wouldn’t like to do a complete FORTUNE cover as a bas-relief. He said he’d be delighted and showed up shortly after with four or five pencil sketches. When we picked our favorite he went to work with chisels and gouges, and produced, by the “negative cut” technique, a slab of plaster the exact size of the cover, plus, on the lefthand edge, the “spine”—the portion that wraps around the binding edge of the magazine. It was complete not only with Mr. Kreis’s extremely handsome design, but with the necessary apparatus like the name, the FORTUNE cover frame, the lettering showing price, volume, and number, and date—all cut in reverse. From this negative he then made a positive cast. That was our original. The job was then to light it properly and photograph it for three-color offset reproduction. We had to use some funny inks to get the proper facsimile effect, but everything worked as planned, and we hope you like the result.
     Mr. Kreis, a German who had had enough of his homeland in 1923 and has lived in the U.S. since, began as an apprentice stone carver, and in the beginning had to take time out from that to unload freight cars, help dig foundations for statues, and even sell tombstones. In this country he went ahead fast—first as a protege of the late Joseph Urban, later as assistant to Sculptors Carl Paul Jennewein and Paul Manship. On his own now, he has designed sculptures for several U.S. Government buildings, has exhibited widely, and a few years ago won a prize from the National Sculpture society for his bas-reliefs. He has also designed three commemorative half-dollar pieces: the Charter Oak Half Dollar for the Connecticut Tercentenary, the P.T. Barnum Half Dollar for Bridgeport’s centennial, and the Senator Robinson Half Dollar for the Arkansas centennial. 

FORTUNE January 1938

Antonio Petruccelli, Illustrator
Eleanor Treacy, Art Director 

FORTUNE January 1937

Antonio Petruccelli, Illustrator
Eleanor Treacy, Art Director 

Xmas Greetings!

FORTUNE’s Christmas card designed by art director Will Burtin, December 1941
image source: designobserver.com


Cover Illustrator of the Day: John Hersey

Cover Illustrator of the Day: John Hersey
FORTUNE November 2003
Robert Newman
, Design Director

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Romare Beardon

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Romare Bearden
FORTUNE January 1968
Walter Allner, Art Director
Original credit: For this special issue, Fortune commissioned Negro artist Romare Bearden, fifty-three, to convey his own mood of urban life. What Bearden pieced together is the striking collage on the cover. Bearden knows the neighborhood signposts well; he grew up in Harlem. He serves as art director of the Harlem Cultural Council, which seeks to encourage promising Negroes in the arts. For Bearden, the assignment was reminiscent of an earlier one. In 1942, he painted a picture to accompany a Fortune article on an all too familiar subject: the Negro and discrimination.

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Mark Matcho

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Mark Matcho
FORTUNE May 2011
John Korpics, Creative Director

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Herbert Bayer

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Herbert Bayer
FORTUNE August 1940
Francis Brennan, Art Director

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Herbert Bayer

Cover Illustrator of the Day: Herbert Bayer
FORTUNE February 1943
Peter Piening
, Art Director